Author Archives: Office of Communications and Marketing

Record Interest in White Mountain Revives Winter Open House Event

On Monday, February 17, 2020, The White Mountain School hosted its first Winter Open House event in at least five years for prospective students and families with nearly two dozen guests in attendance.

“Over the past few years, we have been experiencing increasingly profound and historic levels of enthusiastic engagement with the School at every step of the admissions process, from inquiry to enrollment,” said Allison Letourneau, associate head of school for enrollment management. “Being able to revive this event at the School is a testament to how engaged prospective students and families have been during the 2019-2020 academic year in particular.”

Throughout the day, prospective families had multiple opportunities to tour White Mountain’s facilities and interact with students, faculty, and staff. During the morning, prospective students visited the Inquiry, Innovation, and Impact Lab (I^3 Lab). They participated in a design challenge led by Mike Peller, assistant head of school for teaching and learning, and Alexis Waller, director of inquiry, innovation, and impact. Working in small groups with a current White Mountain student, prospective students built the tallest tower possible using only dry spaghetti, marshmallows, twine, and tape. During the same time, parents were able to hear from and ask questions of a panel of students and faculty, including Jaylynn Alexander ’20; Nicholas “Nickel” Carlson ’20; Kim Cooper, interim director of equity and inclusion and an English teacher; James “J.J.” Cromer, senior class advisor and a humanities teacher; and Rebecca Dickinson, academic dean and director of White Mountain’s Learning Center. At lunch, both students and parents had the opportunity to hear from Head of School John Drew.

In the afternoon, prospective students had the opportunity to participate in one of four student activities with current White Mountain students and faculty: dance, robotics, rock climbing, or skiing. These activities, only a sampling of the opportunities White Mountain offers, allowed prospective students to experience White Mountain’s philosophy of student-driven inquiry directly. This approach enables students to engage and find success in work that matters to them based on their natural curiosities, strengths, and passions. Optional campus tours and interviews with staff from White Mountain’s Office of Admission were also offered.

White Mountain’s next admission-related event will be Admission Decision Day on Tuesday, March 10. Admission Decision Day is used by most independent schools across the United States as the day when admission and financial aid decisions are officially communicated to prospective students and families. Between March 29-30, admitted students and their families will have the opportunity to explore White Mountain in even greater depth during the Accepted Student Program. Additional details about the Accepted Student Program will be released closer to the date of the event. Prospective White Mountain students and families have until Friday, April 10, to decide whether or not to enroll in the School for the 2020-2021 academic year.

Prospective students and families interested in visiting White Mountain outside of public events hosted by the Office of Admission should call the office at (603) 444-2928, ext. 226, or email admission@whitemountain.org.


Founded in 1886 and set in the beautiful White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, The White Mountain School is a coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day school for 135 students grades 9-12/PG. Our mission is to be a school of inquiry and engagement. Grounded in an Episcopal heritage, White Mountain prepares and inspires students to lead lives of curiosity, courage, and compassion.

Award-Winning Musician Guy Davis Brings the Blues to White Mountain

On Friday, February 7, 2020, The White Mountain School proudly welcomed internationally-acclaimed blues musician, Guy Davis, to campus. Davis both hosted a private workshop on stage presence with students, as well as an evening public performance, which, despite some of the heaviest winter weather of the season, was well-attended by area residents.

Davis’ visit was arranged as part of White Mountain’s Cultural Event Series, which aims to connect White Mountain students and the community at large with rich cultural and performing arts productions. The Cultural Event Series also aims to support White Mountain’s broader commitment to equity and inclusion by featuring artists from diverse cultural and musical backgrounds. At the workshop, Davis led students through several interactive exercises designed to help them shed their inhibitions around performing publicly, discussed his journey in finding his identity on stage, as well as other tales from his exciting career, and played a few of his songs campfire-style with only a harmonica. In the evening, Davis played both classics from his extensive catalog of music and previewed several unreleased songs that will appear on future albums.

Guy Davis has spent his musical life carrying his message of the blues around the world, from the Equator to the Arctic Circle, earning him the title “An Ambassador of the Blues.” The son of Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis, Guy fell under the spell of blues icons like Blind Willie McTell and Fats Waller at an early age. His one-man play, “The Adventures of Fishy Waters: In Bed With the Blues,” premiered off-Broadway in the 1990s and has since been released as a double CD. He went on to star off-Broadway as the legendary Robert Johnson in “Robert Johnson: Trick The Devil,” winning the Blues Foundation’s “Keeping the Blues Alive” award. He followed the footsteps of another blues legend when he joined the Broadway production of “Finian’s Rainbow,” playing the part originated by Sonny Terry in 1947.

In 1995, Davis’ much-praised solo debut, “Stomp Down the Rider” on Red House Records, marked the arrival of a major talent, earning acclaim for his deft acoustic playing, his well-traveled voice, and his literate, yet highly accessible songwriting. He’s barely rested since then, taking his music to television (“Late Night with Conan O’Brien,” the “Late Show with David Letterman”) and radio (“A Prairie Home Companion,” “Mountain Stage,” “World Cafe,” and “E-Town”), as well as performing at theaters and festivals. Along the way, Davis has cut nine critically-acclaimed albums for the Red House label and four for his own label, Smokeydoke Records, and was nominated for nearly a dozen Blues Awards. His parallel careers—as a musician, an author, a music teacher, and a film, television, and Broadway actor—mark Davis as a Renaissance man, yet the blues remain his first and greatest love.

Guy Davis’ performance marked the second of three Cultural Events White Mountain will host during the 2019-2020 academic year. On Friday, April 17, The Dissipated Eight, the oldest a cappella group at Middlebury College, will perform. Additional details about the Dissipated Eight performance will be released closer to the date of the show.


Founded in 1886 and set in the beautiful White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, The White Mountain School is a coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day school for 135 students grades 9-12/PG. Our mission is to be a school of inquiry and engagement. Grounded in an Episcopal heritage, White Mountain prepares and inspires students to lead lives of curiosity, courage, and compassion.

White Mountain Students Raise Over $450 for Local Food Cupboard

From Left: Arli Moyao-Ramirez '21, The Rev. Curtis E. Metzger, Phoebe Ross '21, Sophie Turnbull '22, Karleen Kennedy-Wright '21, Nicholas "Nickel" Carlson '20, Rebecca Hill-Larsen, and Rachel Van Wylen.

From Left: Arli Moyao-Ramirez ’21, The Rev. Curtis E. Metzger, Phoebe Ross ’21, Sophie Turnbull ’22, Karleen Kennedy-Wright ’21, Nicholas “Nickel” Carlson ’20, Rebecca Hill-Larsen, and Rachel Van Wylen.

Students at The White Mountain School and Rachel Van Wylen, chair of the School’s Art Department, recently presented representatives from All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Littleton with the proceeds raised through the fall 2019 Empty Bowls fundraiser at the School.

The Empty Bowls fundraiser, which has been held at the School for several years, allows students at all levels of experience to create and auction off bowls and other pottery pieces to members of the School and the local community. This year, the students’ creations raised $469.25 in total, which was accepted by The Rev. Curtis E. Metzger and Rebecca Hill-Larsen from All Saints’.

The proceeds of the Empty Bowls fundraiser will help support All Saints’ Emergency Food Cupboard. The Emergency Food Cupboard provides food and other critical personal supplies to North Country individuals and families in need. It is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:00 to 10:00 a.m. and on Sundays from 9:00 to 9:45 a.m. Anyone is welcome to receive assistance twice in every calendar month. The ministry, housed and administered by All Saints’, is a collaborative effort of several Littleton area churches and community organizations, such as White Mountain. In 2019 alone, the Emergency Food Cupboard served over 1,700 households, over 3,800 individuals, and provided food for over 34,700 meals.


Founded in 1886 and set in the beautiful White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, The White Mountain School is a coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day school for 135 students grades 9-12/PG. Our mission is to be a school of inquiry and engagement. Grounded in an Episcopal heritage, White Mountain prepares and inspires students to lead lives of curiosity, courage, and compassion.

An Update on New Campus Construction from CFO Rob Constantine

When White Mountain students return for the fall 2020 semester, they will be greeted by a new two-story, 30-bed dormitory on the former sites of Carriage House and Green House. The new dormitory, which will include three new faculty apartments, represents the first new student housing in over four decades at White Mountain, the last of which was Solar Dormitory in the 1970s. A new faculty residence will also be built nearby, which, among other things, will help the School accommodate mid-to-large-sized families. 

Want to learn more about how this groundbreaking project came to fruition and how these new facilities will improve community and accessibility for White Mountain? Check out the 2019-2020 issue of Echoes, the School’s alumnae/i magazine, which will arrive in mailboxes later this spring. Until then, please enjoy this mid-year update from White Mountain CFO Rob Constantine. 


Despite winter, work continues in earnest on this exciting construction project at The White Mountain School. Most of the fall was spent focused on clearing two existing facilities (Green House and Carriage House) from the site and finalizing plans with input from students, faculty, and staff. We finalized plans for the new faculty residence in January and plans for the new dorm at the beginning of February. Plans for the new dorm are on display in the lobby of McLane Building and are generating a lot of excitement among students, especially as the enrollment process for next year begins!

In an effort to maximize our short building window due to weather and school-year calendar, the Board of Trustees decided to use a modular building process for both facilities. We had wonderful success with this in completing another faculty duplex in 2017 and are working with the same builder for the current project. They are familiar with schools—having worked with Proctor Academy and the University of New Hampshire to provide new residences, along with many other commercial and residential projects. Using a modular process allows building and site work to take place simultaneously and during the dead of winter, cutting down building time significantly. Modular building also allows for maximum energy efficiency since units are prepared and sealed off-site and in a controlled setting, minimizing the potential for gaps in insulation. Since the modular construction facility is located nearby in New Hampshire, this also minimizes the environmental and financial impacts associated with transporting the units to the site. The faculty unit is already under construction in their workshop!

January was a busy month on-site. Early in the month, the excavation team focused on roughing out the site to identify and remove ledge. As expected here in the White Mountains of the Granite State, there was some ledge, but we were able to minimize the need for blasting through siting of the two facilities. For a couple of days, there was a little excitement to know that three whistles meant 15 minutes and one whistle meant an imminent blast and low rumble if you were in the vicinity! Once the ledge was cleared, our focus moved to preparing the site for foundations. At the end of January, the faculty unit site was fully prepared, and we expect to begin pouring foundation in early February. The larger dorm site should be ready by the end of February for that foundation.

We expect to set the faculty residence modulars in March and the dorm units in late April. Once those are in place, it will be a flurry of activity tying everything together, finishing landscaping the site—with a few new large rocks incorporated into the plans—and welcoming students in September with the opening of the 2020-2021 school year.


Founded in 1886 and set in the beautiful White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, The White Mountain School is a coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day school for 135 students grades 9-12/PG. Our mission is to be a school of inquiry and engagement. Grounded in an Episcopal heritage, White Mountain prepares and inspires students to lead lives of curiosity, courage, and compassion.

Internationally Acclaimed Performer, Guy Davis, to Perform at The White Mountain School, Feb. 7

On Friday, Feb. 7, beginning at 7:00 p.m., The White Mountain School (371 West Farm Road) will present a free and engaging event featuring internationally acclaimed blues musician Guy Davis. White Mountain proudly presents this program as part of its Cultural Event Series, which aims to connect White Mountain students and the community at large with rich cultural and performing arts productions.

Guy Davis has spent his musical life carrying his message of the blues around the world, from the Equator to the Arctic Circle, earning him the title “An Ambassador of the Blues.” The son of Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis, Guy fell under the spell of blues icons like Blind Willie McTell and Fats Waller at an early age. His one-man play, “The Adventures of Fishy Waters: In Bed With the Blues,” premiered off-Broadway in the 1990s and has since been released as a double CD. He went on to star off-Broadway as the legendary Robert Johnson in “Robert Johnson: Trick The Devil,” winning the Blues Foundation’s “Keeping the Blues Alive” award. He followed the footsteps of another blues legend when he joined the Broadway production of “Finian’s Rainbow,” playing the part originated by Sonny Terry in 1947.

In 1995, Davis’ much-praised solo debut, “Stomp Down the Rider” on Red House Records, marked the arrival of a major talent, earning acclaim for his deft acoustic playing, his well-traveled voice, and his literate, yet highly accessible songwriting. He’s barely rested since then, taking his music to television (“Late Night with Conan O’Brien,” the “Late Show with David Letterman”) and radio (“A Prairie Home Companion,” “Mountain Stage,” “World Cafe,” and “E-Town”), as well as performing at theaters and festivals. Along the way, Davis has cut nine critically-acclaimed albums for the Red House label and four for his own label, Smokeydoke Records, and was nominated for nearly a dozen Blues Awards. His parallel careers—as a musician, an author, a music teacher, and a film, television, and Broadway actor—mark Davis as a Renaissance man, yet the blues remain his first and greatest love.

This performance will take place in White Mountain’s Lovejoy Chapel, and parking for off-campus guests will be available at any of the School’s public lots. The locations of Lovejoy Chapel and parking lots are marked clearly on White Mountain’s campus map. This performance is free and open to the public.

Guy Davis is the second of three Cultural Events White Mountain will host as part of its Cultural Events Series, which aims to support White Mountain’s broader commitment to equity and inclusion by featuring artists from diverse cultural and musical backgrounds.  On Friday, April 17, The Dissipated Eight, the oldest a cappella group at Middlebury College, will perform. Additional details about the Dissipated Eight performance will be released closer to the date of the show.


Founded in 1886 and set in the beautiful White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, The White Mountain School is a coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day school for 135 students grades 9-12/PG. Our mission is to be a school of inquiry and engagement. Grounded in an Episcopal heritage, White Mountain prepares and inspires students to lead lives of curiosity, courage, and compassion.

Community Health Update (Jan. 30) from The White Mountain School

The following letter was sent from The White Mountain School’s Head of School John Drew to members of the School community via email on the morning of Thursday, January 30, 2020.


Dear White Mountain Community,

I’m writing today to provide an update on the international student who has been in medical quarantine at Littleton Regional Healthcare (LRH) for possible novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) since Thursday of last week. Since that time, we have been working closely with the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services (DPHS) and LRH to understand and ensure adherence to the experts’ recommended protocols and guidance, taking great care to respect the privacy of our student and the student’s family every step of the way.

We are pleased to share that DPHS has informed us that the test results were negative for the 2019-nCoV. The DPHS press release can be found here.

While no other students or employees at White Mountain have reported symptoms associated with the 2019-nCoV, our Health Services staff continues to follow and promote all DPHS and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines related to hygiene and prevention of the transmission of disease.

We are most appreciative of our student for taking precautionary and immediate steps upon recognizing and reporting cold-like symptoms, steps this student and the student’s family took out of concern for our students and the broader community. In addition, we are incredibly grateful for the swift guidance and assistance of the DPHS team and the care of the LRH medical professionals.

We are aware that media and other parties are interested in our student, and the media may try to contact members of the community for the student’s contact information or other details. Please help us continue to respect the student’s privacy by not identifying or sharing that information, including on social media.

School administrators will continue to carefully monitor the developing situation around the 2019-nCoV, both internationally and domestically. We will also work with international students and families who may have concerns about or decide not to travel home for spring break in March. If 2019-nCoV or any other infectious disease impacts our School at some point in the future, we have a number of procedures in place to identify affected students, minimize transmission, and ensure the health and safety of both the School and the local community.

Since sharing the news about our quarantined student, I have received an outpouring of support from many members of the White Mountain community. This is not surprising and is one more example of how our community comes together to support one another. From offers to house students, if needed, to sentiments of concern for our student during his many days living in uncertainty far from home, our families have proven once again that our School community is like no other. Thank you.

As always, if you have any questions or concerns not addressed in this letter, please do not hesitate to contact Corah Edwards RN P’20, our director of health services, or me.

Best,

John

John A. Drew
Head of School


Founded in 1886 and set in the beautiful White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, The White Mountain School is a coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day school for 135 students grades 9-12/PG. Our mission is to be a school of inquiry and engagement. Grounded in an Episcopal heritage, White Mountain prepares and inspires students to lead lives of curiosity, courage, and compassion.

White Mountain Visited by Accomplished Tap Artist Julie Joseph

This fall, The White Mountain School has been privileged to host Julie Joseph, a Boston-based performer, choreographer, and teacher, on campus several times as a guest artist. Throughout the semester, students from White Mountain and Creative Edge Dance Studio alike have benefitted from Julie’s world-class experience in tap dancing.

At her first visit to White Mountain, Julie held auditions for a new tap piece, which were open to White Mountain and Creative Edge students in grades 9-12. Six students were ultimately selected, including: Rayelinn Bromley, Claudia Canuto, Kiersten Doughty ’23, Jessie Gall, Vendy Pospisilova ’20, Rose Sullivan. Julie worked intensively with these six dancers to develop an original tap piece, which will be featured in Creative Edge’s 2020 Recital, which will take place May 22-23.

Later in the semester, Julie returned to campus and held a tap masterclass, which was attended by participants ranging in age from 11 to adult. The participants were able to stretch their boundaries throughout the masterclass, and many experienced tap improvisation for the first time.

Julie Joseph and participants in her recent masterclass at Creative Edge Dance Studio.

Julie Joseph and participants in her recent masterclass at Creative Edge Dance Studio.

“Bringing guest artists to campus allows our students to be exposed to new teachers and new styles of dance, and they benefit in several different ways. It’s essential for dancers to be versatile, and having classes with somebody who focuses on different aspects of technique, runs a class differently, or has a novel approach to choreography allows our students to practice and develop that versatility,” explains Dinah Gray, director of dance. “Working with artists other than our regular faculty also broadens our dancers’ networks, setting up relationships that can be continued beyond the artist’s stint at the school. Students also get the opportunity to practice their skills as auditioners, learning to work effectively in a situation where the stakes are heightened beyond a typical dance class with familiar teachers.”

Dinah aims to bring in at least one guest artist each academic year and is currently working to find a guest artist to teach at White Mountain’s Summer Dance Intensive in 2020. The Summer Dance Intensive is a two-week residential summer program designed for dancers entering grades 6 through 12 that exposes participants to several styles of dance, including ballet, jazz, and contemporary.

“I had so many great experiences with guest artists during my high school and college years, and it’s really gratifying to be able to bring similar opportunities to our students,” says Dinah. “I learn a lot from watching other artists work with students. It’s really helpful to hear new information and also really validating to hear somebody speak to some of the same concepts and values that I try to share with our students.”


Founded in 1886 and set in the beautiful White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, The White Mountain School is a coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day school for 135 students grades 9-12/PG. Our mission is to be a school of inquiry and engagement. Grounded in an Episcopal heritage, White Mountain prepares and inspires students to lead lives of curiosity, courage, and compassion.

Students and Community Feel the Music at Cultural Event Series with New Inca Son

The White Mountain School’s annual Cultural Event Series kicked off on Nov. 15 with a lively and interactive performance by the award-winning group, New Inca Son, who performed music and dance of the Peruvian Andes.

New Inca Son is a musical and dance ensemble with a mission: to preserve its indigenous heritage and to instill, particularly in children and young people, an understanding and appreciation of it. The group both performs and educates, offering hands-on workshops, interactive concerts, and residencies for students in schools. One such workshop was held before the group’s performance at White Mountain, and students had the opportunity to try their hand at the Peruvian pan flute and later joined the group in a number in front of the community.

“Through the Cultural Event Series, we hope to expose students to multi-cultural performances that remind them of the beauty and complexity of many cultures from around the world and to grow from art forms that they may not be familiar with,” said Becky Beno, a member of White Mountain’s faculty who has organized the Cultural Event Series for over a decade.

Many of the students who participated in the workshop have played or currently play other musical instruments and were able to compare and contrast their experiences with the pan flutes.

“The most challenging part was the breathing aspect of playing the pan flutes, you had to control your breathing in order not to run out of breath,” said Judah Borges ’20. “I played the flute a long time ago, something that was different in this instance was the team aspect. The flute was a solo instrument, here you had to be in sync with others around you.”

“The workshop went really well, a lot of people showed up, which was great because we were able to get a good sound together,” said Addie Laster ’23. “I’ve played the flute, accordion, and guitar before. In comparison to the flute, these pan flutes were definitely easier to figure out how to hold and play.”

White Mountain’s Cultural Event Series aims to connect White Mountain students and the community at large with rich cultural and performing arts productions. Throughout the 2019-20 academic year, White Mountain will host two additional events as part of its Cultural Events Series, which aims to support White Mountain’s broader commitment to equity and inclusion by featuring artists from diverse cultural and musical backgrounds. On Feb. 7, Guy Davis, known internationally as a leading ambassador of the blues, will perform. On April 17, the Dissipated Eight, the oldest a cappella group at Middlebury College, will perform. Additional details about these two events will be released in 2020, closer to the date of each performance.

Initiatives like the Cultural Event Series are made possible due to generous support of White Mountain’s Annual Fund.


Founded in 1886 and set in the beautiful White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, The White Mountain School is a coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day school for 135 students grades 9-12/PG. Our mission is to be a school of inquiry and engagement. Grounded in an Episcopal heritage, White Mountain prepares and inspires students to lead lives of curiosity, courage, and compassion.

White Mountain’s 2019 Fall Open House Sees Record Attendance

Senior Ayanna Dukes '20 leads a group of prospective students on a campus tour.

Senior Ayanna Dukes ’20 leads a group of prospective students on a campus tour.

On Sunday, Nov. 10, 2019, The White Mountain School set a new record for attendance at its Fall Open House event for prospective students and families. Over 80 total guests were in attendance, making this White Mountain’s most well-attended admissions event to date.

“This year’s record high attendance is truly a testament to the great work our entire team—faculty, staff, and administrators—all do and have been doing,” said Allison Letourneau, associate head of school for enrollment management. “It is clear that people are genuinely interested and excited about the amazing work happening at White Mountain and that our intentional, close-knit community is resonating with prospective students and families alike.”

Throughout the day, prospective families had multiple opportunities to tour White Mountain’s facilities and interact with students, faculty, and staff. During the morning, prospective students visited the Inquiry, Innovation, and Impact Lab and participated in a design challenge led by Mike Peller, assistant head of school for teaching and learning, and Tory Dobbin, a faculty member in the Department of World Languages. Working in small groups with 1-2 current White Mountain students, prospective students built the tallest tower possible using only dry spaghetti, marshmallows, twine, and tape.

In the early afternoon, prospective students had the opportunity to participate in one of four student activities with current White Mountain students and faculty: art, climbing, robotics, or writing. These activities, only a sampling of the opportunities White Mountain offers, allowed prospective students to experience White Mountain’s philosophy of student-driven inquiry directly. This approach enables students to engage and find success in work that matters to them based on their natural curiosities, strengths, and passions.

“White Mountain is a small school, but a school that offers an incredible amount of choice. In ninth and tenth grade, students choose many of the courses that they take, and starting in junior year, every single class that’s on a student’s plate is one that they have actively selected,” said Mike. “This amount of choice sparks or re-sparks the natural curiosity and enthusiasm for learning that we see in young kids. Our approach allows and helps students at White Mountain become the dynamic learners that we know they can be. During college interviews, our students are able to talk about projects and experiences that they’re truly excited about, and it shows and leaves an impact.”

White Mountain’s Office of Admission will hold two additional open house-style events during early 2020. On Feb. 17, prospective students and families will have the opportunity to visit campus at a Winter Open House with a similar agenda to the Fall Open House. Between April 29-30, admitted students and their families will have the opportunity to explore White Mountain in greater depth at Admitted Students Day. Additional details about these two events will be released closer to the date of each event.

Prospective students and families interested in visiting White Mountain outside of these events should call the Office of Admission at (603) 444-2928, ext. 226, or email admission@whitemountain.org.


Founded in 1886 and set in the beautiful White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, The White Mountain School is a coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day school for 135 students grades 9-12/PG. Our mission is to be a school of inquiry and engagement. Grounded in an Episcopal heritage, White Mountain prepares and inspires students to lead lives of curiosity, courage, and compassion.

Internationally Acclaimed Group, New Inca Son, to Perform at The White Mountain School, Nov. 15

New Inca SonOn Friday, Nov. 15, beginning at 7:00 p.m., The White Mountain School (371 West Farm Road) will present a free and engaging event featuring traditional music and culture of the Peruvian Andes. The award-winning group, New Inca Son, will bring to life the rich musical traditions of the Andes in an interactive and lively performance that will have audiences swaying and clapping along. White Mountain proudly presents this program as part of its Cultural Event Series, which aims to connect White Mountain students and the community at large with rich cultural and performing arts productions.

New Inca Son is a musical and dance ensemble with a mission: to preserve its indigenous heritage and to instill, particularly in children and young people, an understanding and appreciation of it. The group both performs and educates, offering hands-on workshops, interactive concerts, and residencies for students in schools. In addition to critical acclaim, the group has received recognition for its educational efforts, including the 2007 “Distinguished Arts Educator in Music” award from the Massachusetts Alliance for Arts Education (MAAE) and the 2009 “Gold Star Award” from the Mass Cultural Council.

For more than two decades, New Inca Son has performed its ancient melodies and dances on world-class stages such as the 1994 FIFA World Cup, 1996 and 2002 Olympic Games, and the White House. In 2015, New Inca Son headlined at the Kennedy Center for the Arts and the Smithsonian Folklife Festival as part of a tribute to Peru. In 2018, New Inca Son performed with its full band, folk dancers, and scissors dancers for an audience of over 6,000 children and families at Philadelphia’s Mann Center for the Performing Arts. This past summer, the group performed at both the New York and Washington, D.C., locations of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.

New Inca Son’s performance will take place in White Mountain’s Lovejoy Chapel, and parking for off-campus guests will be available at any of the school’s public lots. The locations of Lovejoy Chapel and several parking lots are marked clearly on White Mountain’s campus map. This performance is free and open to the public; however, an RSVP through Eventbrite by Wednesday, Nov. 13, is preferred for planning purposes.

Throughout the 2019-20 academic year, White Mountain will host two additional events as part of its Cultural Events Series, which aims to support White Mountain’s broader commitment to equity and inclusion by featuring artists from diverse cultural and musical backgrounds. On Feb. 7, Guy Davis, known internationally as a leading ambassador of the blues, will perform. On April 17, the Dissipated Eight, the oldest a cappella group at Middlebury College, will perform. Additional details about these two events will be released in 2020, closer to the date of each performance.


Founded in 1886 and set in the beautiful White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, The White Mountain School is a coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day school for 135 students grades 9-12/PG. Our mission is to be a school of inquiry and engagement. Grounded in an Episcopal heritage, White Mountain prepares and inspires students to lead lives of curiosity, courage, and compassion.